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Jason Tompkins focuses on consumer litigation defense of individual and class action lawsuits at both the trial and appellate levels. Acting as regional and national counsel for several clients, Jason has been lead counsel on over 200 individual cases and more than a dozen class actions in numerous jurisdictions. He has handled appeals in five federal circuits and recently created a circuit split that culminated in review by the United States Supreme Court.

The Eleventh Circuit recently weighed in on a common practice—reporting debts subject to bankruptcy. In the process of so doing, the opinion in Losch v. Nationstar Mortgage LLC provided litigants some key insights in Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) compliance and litigation strategies, as well as adding another wrinkle in the growing complexity of standing

To start with the headline, on April 21, 2021, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals held that a debt collector sending personal identifying information to dunning letter vendors states a claim under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA). To boot, an allegation that such activity occurred is sufficient to show a concrete injury conferring

In Midland Funding, LLC v. Johnson, 137 S.Ct. 1407 (2017), the U.S. Supreme Court held that filing a proof of claim for a debt subject to a limitations defense does not violate the FDCPA, at least in the vast majority of states where the statute of limitation does not extinguish the right to payment.

Few decisions in the world of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”) have been more awaited than Facebook, Inc. v. Duguid, 592 U.S. — (2021). There, the Supreme Court of the United States (“SCOTUS”) wrestled with the ultimate TCPA question: “whether [an automatic telephone dialing system] encompasses equipment that can ‘store’ and dial telephone